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SK Rapid Wien

SK Rapid Wien is a football (soccer) club from Austria.

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About SK Rapid Wien

The Sportklub Rapid Wien is an Football in Austria club playing in the country's capital city of Vienna. Rapid is the most popular club in Austria and also record title holder having won the Austrian national football title 32 times. It also prides itself as the only team from the former Ostmark, then part of the German Reich, to win the German war-time league in 1941 – as Austria was incorporated into Germany during World War II. The Rapid squad is often known as the "Green-Whites" for its team colours or as Hütteldorfer for the location of the Gerhard Hanappi Stadium, which is in Hütteldorf, part of the city's 14th district, Penzing (Vienna).

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History

The club was founded in 1898 as Erster Wiener Arbeiter-Fußball-Club (en:First Workers' Football Club of Vienna). The team's original colours were red and blue, which are still often used in away matches. On 8 January 1899 the club was re-named, taking on its present name of Sportklub Rapid Wien, following the example of SV Nord Wedding. In 1904, the team colours were changed to green and white.
One of the best teams in early European football, Rapid became a dominant force during the years between the world wars, when Austria was one of the leading football nations on the continent. After the Anschluss of Austria to Germany in 1938, Rapid was part of German football competition, playing in the regional first division Gauliga Ostmark along with clubs such as First Vienna FC and VfB Admira Wacker Mödling. Rapid would be the most successful of these clubs. They won the Tschammerpokal, predecessor of today's German Cup, in 1938 with a 3–1 victory over FSV Frankfurt, and followed that with a German champions (football) in 1941 by defeating Schalke 04, the most dominant German club of the era. The team was able to overcome a 3–0 Schalke lead to win the match by a final score of 4–3 through strength and endurance – the traditional virtues of Rapid players known as the Rapidgeist or "Rapid Spirit".

Almost since the club's beginnings, Rapid fans have announced the last fifteen minutes of the game by way of the legendary "Rapidviertelstunde" – rhythmic clapping at home or away no matter what the score. The first mention of the practise goes back to 1913, and in 1919 a newspaper wrote about the fans clapping at the beginning of the "Rapidviertelstunde". Over the decades, there were many instances where the team managed to turn around a seemingly hopeless situation by not giving up and, with their fans' support, fighting their way to a win just before the final whistle.

Although Rapid is by far the most popular club in Austria, teams with significantly stronger financial backing such as FC Red Bull Salzburg and FC Magna Wiener Neustadt are able to spend much more money on players. Rapid is trying to remain competitive by focusing on developing and supporting younger talent.

The club was involved in a controversial episode in 1984 when they eliminated Celtic F.C. from the European Cup Winners Cup last 16. Strikes from Brian McClair (32 minutes) Murdo MacLeod (45+5 minutes) put Celtic 2–0 ahead at half time. After the interval Tommy Burns (footballer) (68 minutes) scored a controversial third goal to put Celtic 4–3 up on aggregate. With 14 minutes left in the match, Rapid conceded a penalty, after Reinhard Kienast punched Burns on the back of the head while a corner kick was being taken. Rapid players, opposing the decision, crowded around the referee and linesman, close to the Celtic fans. Rapid defender Rudolf Weinhofer then fell to the ground, and claimed to have been hit by a bottle thrown from the stands. Television images clearly showed that the bottle which was thrown onto the pitch did not hit the player. After a delay of some 10 minutes, the penalty was taken by Peter Grant, and he struck it wide. The match finished 3–0, giving Celtic a 4–3 win on aggregate. However, the Austrians appealed to UEFA for a replay, and both teams were fined. The replay appeal was turned down initially, but Rapid appealed for a second time. On this occasion, Rapid's fine was doubled but UEFA also stipulated that the game be replayed 100 miles away from Celtic Park. The game was held on 12 December 1984 at Old Trafford, Manchester and Rapid won 1–0 through a Peter Pacult strike.

Stadium

Rapid Wien now plays at the Gerhard Hanappi Stadium which was opened on 10 May 1977 in a game against FK Austria.

Honours

Rapid Vienna is Austria's record titleholder, winning these a total of 32 times to date. The club won a German Championship and German Cup while part of that country's football competition from 1938-45, following the annexation of Austria by Germany on 12 March 1938.

- National Austrian Championship (32): 1912, 1913, 1916, 1917, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1923, 1929, 1930, 1935, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1946, 1948, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1956, Austrian football championship 1956–57, Austrian football championship 1959–60, Austrian football championship 1963–64, Austrian football championship 1966–67, Austrian football championship 1967–68, Austrian Football Bundesliga 1981-82, Austrian Football Bundesliga 1982-83, Austrian Football Bundesliga 1986–87, Austrian Football Bundesliga 1987-88, Austrian Football Bundesliga 1995-96, Austrian Football Bundesliga 2004-05, Austrian Football Bundesliga 2007–08

- Austrian Cup (14): 1919, 1920, 1927, 1946, 1961, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1976, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1995

- Austrian Supercup: 1986, 1987, 1988, 2008 (Unofficial edition)

- List of German football champions: 1941

- DFB-Pokal: Tschammerpokal 1938

- Mitropa Cup: 1930, 1951

- Intertoto Cup: 1992, 1993

- Cup Winners' Cup Runners Up: 1985, 1996




Out on loan



Retired numbers

5 – Peter Schöttel

Notable players



- Hugo Maradona
- Josef Bican
- Franz Binder
- Robert Dienst
- Ernst Dokupil
- Herbert Feurer
- Toni Fritsch
- György Garics
- Gerhard Hanappi
- Ernst Happel
- Andreas Heraf
- Andreas Herzog
- Josef Hickersberger
- Martin Hiden
- Erwin Hoffer
- Andreas Ivanschitz
- Veli Kavlak
- Reinhard Kienast
- Michael Konsel
- Ümit Korkmaz
- Alfred Körner
- Robert Körner
- Hans Krankl
- Dietmar Kühbauer
- Jürgen Macho
- Sebastián Martínez
- Max Merkel
- Peter Pacult
- Helge Payer
- Peter Persidis
- Heimo Pfeifenberger
- Erich Probst
- Karl Rappan
- Andreas Reisinger
- Gerhard Rodax
- Peter Schöttel
- August Starek
- Josef Uridil
- Heribert Weber
- Arnold Wetl
- Walter Zeman
- Axel Lawarée
- Fabiano de Lima Campos Maria
- Trifon Ivanov
- Samuel Ipoua
- Ante Jazić
- Hernán Medford
- Mario Bazina
- Nikica Jelavić
- Zlatko Kranjčar
- Mario Tokić
- Ladislav Maier
- Antonín Panenka
- René Wagner
- Steffen Hofmann
- Carsten Jancker
- Andreas Lagonikakis
- Farhad Majidi
- Mehdi Pashazadeh
- Branko Bošković
- Dejan Savićević
- Gaston Taument
- Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink
- Jan Åge Fjørtoft
- Krzysztof Ratajczyk
- Peter Hlinka
- Jozef Valachovič
- Sulejman Halilović
(1910–25)
- Stanley Willmott (1925–26)
- Eduard Bauer (1926–36)
- Leopold Nitsch (1936–45)
- Hans Pesser (1945–53)
- Josef Uridil (1953–54)
- Viktor Hierländer (1954–55)
- Leopold Gernhardt (1955)
- Franz Wagner (1955)
- Alois Beranek (1956)
- Franz Wagner (1956)
- Max Merkel (1956–58)
- Rudolf Kumhofer (1958–59)
- Robert Körner (1959–66)
- Rudolf Vytlacil (1966–68)
- Karl Decker (footballer) (1968–70)
- Rudolf Vytlacil (1968–69)
- Karl Rappan (1969–70)
- Gerd Springer (1970–72)
- Robert Körner (1972)
- Ernst Hlozek (1972–75)
- Josef Pecanka (1975)
- Franz Binder / Robert Körner (1975–76)
- Antoni Brzezanczyk (1976–77)
- Robert Körner (1977–78)
- Karl Schlechta (1978–79)
- Walter Skocik (1979–82)
- Rudolf Nuske (1982)
- Otto Barić (1982–85)
- Vlatko Marković (1985–86)
- Otto Barić (1986–88)
- Wilhelm Kaipel (1988)
- Vlatko Marković (1988–89)
- Hans Krankl (1989–92)
- August Starek (1992–93)
- Hubert Baumgartner (1993–94)
- Ernst Dokupil (1994–98)
- Heribert Weber (1998–00)
- Ernst Dokupil (2000–01)
- Peter Persidis (2001)
- Lothar Matthäus (2001–02)
- Josef Hickersberger (2002–05)
- Georg Zellhofer (Jan 2006–Aug 06)
- Peter Pacult (Sept 2006–April 11)
- Zoran Barisic (April 2011–May 11)
- Peter Schöttel (June 2011–)
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